Orange Peels, Newspapers May Lead to Cheaper, Cleaner Ethanol Fuel

The article titled Orange Peels, Newspapers May Lead to Cheaper, Cleaner Ethanol Fuel mentions that a groundbreaking technique is developed by University of Central Florida professor, Henry Daniell, by using waste products such as orange peels and newspapers to produce ethanol. Daniell’s technique uses a cocktail of enzymes derived from plants to convert orange peels and newspaper wastes into sugar which can then be converted into ethanol. Normally, ethanol derived from corn produces more greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline but ethanol produced from Daniell’s technique releases fewer greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline or electricity. What is more interesting is that not only using such wastes to produce ethanol helps in making the environment greener but it also reduces the rise in food prices and shortage of food supply. Although Daniell’s technique is a first step in using such wastes to produce biofuels and additional research is required for this technique to reach the market, it is a promising step for the future of alternative fuels. Daniell’s team focusses on cloning genes from wood-rotting fungi and bacteria which are then inserted into tobacco plants such that the enzymes made from the tobacco plants are much cheaper than when manufactured synthetically. This article briefly introduces a research that sounds really exciting and may have potential success for biofuels. Daniell’s technique, if successful, can not only produce cheaper, cleaner ethanol but reduces the problem of waste management and shortage of food supply.

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